Determiners – General determiners rules of English grammar

What are determiners?

A determiner is used to modify a noun. It indicates reference to something specific or something of a particular type. This function is usually performed by articles, demonstratives, possessive determiners, or quantifiers.

Determiners vs pronouns

Determiners are followed by a noun.

⇒ The man
This book
Some people

Subject pronouns ( I , you , he , etc.) and possessive pronouns (mine, yours, his, etc.) cannot be determiners because they can never be followed by a noun.


Types of determiners


Articles

The definite and indefinite articles are all determiners.

Definite article – the
Indefinite article – a or an (a is used before a consonant sound; an is used before a vowel sound.)

Examples:

Close the door, please.
I’ve got a friend in Canada.

Demonstratives

There are four demonstrative determiners in English and they are: this, that, these and those

Note that demonstrative determiners can also be used as demonstrative pronouns. When they are used as determiners they are followed by the nouns they modify. Compare:

⇒ This is my camera. (Demonstrative used as a pronoun, subject of the verb is)
This camera is mine. (Demonstrative used as a determiner modifying the noun camera.)




Possessives

Possessive adjectives – my, your, his, her, its, our, your, their – modify the noun following it in order to show possession.

Possessive determiners are different from possessive pronouns – mine, his, hers, yours, ours, their.

Possessive pronouns can stand alone and are not followed by nouns.
Possessive determiners, on the other hand, are followed by nouns.

Compare:

This is my house. (my is a possessive determiner. It is followed by the noun house which it modifies)
Is that car yours? (yours is a possessive pronoun. It is not followed by a noun.)


Quantifiers

Quantifiers are followed by nouns which they modify. Examples of quantifiers include:

some, any, few, little, more, much, many, each, every, both, all, enough, half, little, whole, less etc.

Quantifiers are commonly used before either countable or uncountable nouns.

He knows more people than his wife.
Little knowledge is a dangerous thing .


Read briefly about  Articles
Read briefly about Demonstratives
Read briefly about Possessive adjectives
Read briefly about quantifiers


You May Also Like

About the Author: GFC Staff

Our staff explores the Internet what’s possible and share knowledge and information with career seekers. They also Like to dig into various leading newspapers, important books, magazines etc. for important questions and MCQs. The team is led by Iqbal Hussain

Leave a Reply

Thanks for choosing to leave a reply. Your opinions and comments are very important to us, and your email address will NOT be published. If you need a private conversation then use our contact form. Please add an avatar if you do not have and make the comment section more beautiful.

Join us. We are social.

Subscribe to get FREE updates

gfc-newslater
Join 1000s of readers around the globe. Don’t worry. We also don’t like Spam. We are weekly.

Subscribe to get FREE updates

gfc-newslater
Join 1000s of readers around the globe. Don’t worry. We also don’t like Spam. We are weekly.